Volkstaat PDF Print E-mail
Thursday, 07 July 2011 16:35

The following text in black, was taken from Wikipedia in Italian, saving the July 1, 2011, and here translated in English, revived and saved before it can be altered with errors of all kinds. The blue text was added by “Volkstaat.org”.

 

The Vierkleur, the “Four Colours” flag, was the Boer Republic flag in Transvaal, the Zuid Afrikaanse Republiek (ZAR). It is now the main symbol of Boer nationalists.

The Vierkleur, the “Four Colours” flag, was the flag of the Boer Republic in the Transvaal, the Zuid Afrikaanse Republiek (ZAR). It is now the main symbol of Boer nationalists.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boer nationalists and white Afrikaners give to the term “volkstaat” (“State of the nation” in English) different meanings. For the Boer nationalists, “volkstaat” is the “Boerestaat” (Boer State), that must be built through a restoration of the free Boer Republics in southern Africa (the South African Republic – ZAR -  and the Orange Free State), that were been internationally recognized.
For the white Afrikaners, volkstaat is the re-establishment of a small part of the territories of the Union of South Africa (subsequently known as Republic of South Africa, RSA), the macro-State they officially administrated from 1948 to 1994, forged in 1902 by international capitalism by the military force of the British Empire, who after having defeated the Boer republics annexed them to its colonies.
Both projects, even if different from each other, historically intend to demographically transform the interested areas, so that the resident population becomes homogeneous.

1. Afrikaners and Boers
2. Afrikaner “nationalism”
3. Boer nationalism
4. Nationalist history after the Boer Republics’ annexation
5. Identity crisis
6. Contemporary nationalist movements
7. Volkstaat.org


1. Afrikaners and Boers
“Afrikaner” and “Boer” haven’t the same meaning, even if they’re often (and erroneously) used as synonyms. The Boer history isn’t the Afrikaner one. With the word “Afrikaner” (in English: African) we traditionally mean all the Afrikaans mother-tongue. Boers are the biological and spiritual progeny of the Trekboer (semi-nomadic migrants), the Voortrekker (pioneers) and the Boer Republics citizens. The majority of “white Afrikaners” weren’t Trekboers and didn’t follow the Voortrekker during the Great Trek. They stayed in the Cape, pleased to submit themselves to the Dutch colonial government, and for this reason they’re still known as “Cape Dutch”. They weren’t Boer Republics citizens and during the II Anglo-Boer War they fought under the banner of the British Empire, driven by international capitalism, against the Boers.

2. Afrikaner “nationalism”
The so-called “white Afrikaner nationalism” was promoted by the South African Union (British dominion), in order to enforce itself in an anti-Boer (independentist) point of view. This ideology, mainly based on “race” (with reference only to the colour of the skin) and language, formed the basis of the South African Republic (RSA), born in 1961 from the South African Union, and the Apartheid.

3. Boer nationalism
Boers are fully-fledged Africans, because their nation and culture developed in Africa, and they always avoided colonialism (Dutch and afterwards British) in order to search for freedom. All of this is the contrary of what the white non-Boer Afrikaners did. For this reason, the Boer nationalists feel themselves as the one and only “volk” (the only white African nation) and for them the term “volkstaat” is synonymous of “Boerestaat”. The Boer identity has been almost deleted by the Afrikaner propaganda of the RSA, so all “whites” (with reference only to the colour of the skin) had to feel themselves part of an unique nation. The Boer history, instead of being considered as genesis of a specific nation, started to be used as part of a bigger whole. This group included the Cape Dutch, the South African British and, in general, all the white residents. The Boer nationalist feeling began to re-arise in the late Seventies, thanks to the book “Boerestaat” by Robert van Tonder.

4. Nationalist history after the Boer Republics’ annexation
In 1914, at the beginning of the WWI, Boers rebelled with weapons against the government of the Union of South Africa, in order to re-establish their Republics. Boers were defeated by the army, loyal to the Union, mainly composed by white Afrikaners.
In 1939, some Boer nationalists founded the Ossewabrandwag (OB, in English “Ox-wagon Sentinel”) a political, cultural and paramilitary movement, that asked for the restoration of Boer Republics. OB achieved to have 300,000-500,000 members; some its affiliates refused to join the Union of South Africa army and boycotted its military intervention at Great Britain’s side during the WWII. The Ossewabrandwag started its decline in 1948, when the Nasionale Party (NP, in English: National Party) rose to power. The NP sustained and promoted the white Afrikaner “nationalism”.
Between late-Seventies and early Nineties, some white Afrikaner movements rallied to the Boer nationalism. The most important among them was the Afrikaner Weerstandsbeweging (AWB, in English: Afrikaner Resistance Movement).
Between late-Eighties and early 90s, the white Afrikaner “nationalism” (non-Boer) started to claim for another State, with different boundaries, that were a lot smaller than the Republic of South Africa (RSA) ones. This State was supposed to be called Orandeë and develop into the Cape (the former British colony). In the course of the years, only a small community has been founded, composed by white Afrikaners, called Orania.
In 1990 a wave of bomb attacks were scored by the Boer nationalists. A bomb exploded in Melrose House, Pretoria, were in 1902 a peace treaty was signed, which ended the II Anglo-Boer War and the existence of Boer Republics.
In 1993, some former RSA generals and various parties and movements, including AWB, joined together and founded the Afrikaner Volksfront (AVF, in English “Afrikaner People-Nation Front”), claiming independence on majority of the lands, property of Boer Republics (almost 16% of the Republic of South Africa). One of the two AVF leaders, general Constand Viljoen (former Chief of RSA Armed Forces) abandoned the coalition in order to establish a new party, called Vryheidsfront (in English: “Freedom Front”). This party joined the multi-national and multi-racial election, set in 1994, that formed the new State of South Africa: the State re-established the borders of the Union of South Africa (created by international capitalism by military force of the British Empire) annexing all the black homelands. This political operation was opposed by the Boer nationalists, in particular AWB members, through political enterprises, bomb attacks and paramilitary actions.
At that time, the Vryhedisfront asked for an independent State for white Afrikaners, following the Orandeë example.
In 1995, some Boer nationalist movements, like AWB and Boerestaat Party (BSP, in English: “Boer State Party”), founded the Boere Republikeinse Verkiesingskommissie (BVK, in English: “Boer Electoral Commission”), that brought to the United Nations, in Geneva, a document in which it described history and identity of the Boer nation. In addition, it denied the “Afrikaner nation” theory and demanded an acknowledgement for the Boers as an indigenous people.
In 2008, the UNPO, Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization, admitted among its members the Afrikaners (referring to “white Afrikaners”), on Vryheidsfront Plus initiative (evolution of the old Vryheidsfront, no longer independentist). In April 2011 Dr. Lets Pretorius, Boer nationalist, wrote to UNPO to challenge it and ask for the recognition of the Boers.

5. Identity crisis
Several States, based on different and sometimes opposing concepts, held the power during the years: this alternation caused a strong identity crisis. Biological Boer descendants usually feel themselves as “white Afrikaners”, “Afrikaners” or just “South Africans”. This crisis can be recognized in thoughts and actions of various political movements.

6. Contemporary nationalist movements
On the “white Afrikaner” autonomist front, the Volksraad Verkiesing Kommissie (VVK, Volksraad Electoral Commission) plays an active role, grouping several political and cultural movements (including AWB). It aspires to gain credit as a political subject, able to treat with the government of the new Republic of South Africa, in order to reach an autonomy on its minor territories.
On the Boer nationalist front, the only association producing certain activity is the Orde Boerevolk (in Afrikaans: “Order of the Boer nation”) of Piet “Skiet” Rudolph.

7. Volkstaat.org
The current “South Africa” state (old RSA plus the black homelands), as every empire, includes more peoples and nations. Like any empire is illegal. All nations have the right to independence.
The white Afrikaners are not a nation. The only volk is the Boerevolk, the only volkstaat is the Boere-volkstaat (the Boer State). No other white volk on the African continent.